Skyline Veterinary hospital & Boarding

Archive for the ‘Doctor’s Notes’ category

How to Keep Pets Safe During a Tornado

Instructions

Things You’ll Need:

  • Kennel or Crate
  • Cages
  • Bottled water
  • Safe place
  • Pet Inside” stickers

Make an Emergency Plan to Keep Pets Safe During a Tornado

  • Step 1:

    Find a kennel, crate or cage for every animal you have. Buckets work well for fish and turtles. Keep all of the animal carriers together in an easy to get to place inside the house.

  • Step 2:

    Choose the safest room in the house for surviving a tornado. A basement is best or the most interior room of the home, preferably a closet or bathroom. Tell everyone living in the house that this is the safe room for tornadoes.

  • Step 3:

    Make an emergency food supply for the pets in case it is in short supply or hard to get to after the storm. Get pull tab cans or pouches for easy opening, and you can toss in a cheap bowl or paper plates. Pack a collar and leash for each dog or cat as well.

  • Step 4:

    Add an extra gallon or two of water to the family emergency supply. This way there will be plenty to go around.

What To Do When a Tornado Siren Sounds or a Tornado Warning is Issued

  • Step 1:

    Put all pets in cages or carriers and in the safe room when the tornado watch is issued. Animals sense bad weather and will look for a place to hide if they sense it is near. There will probably not be much of an argument from the pets in the safe room where it is quiet.

  • Step 2:

    Get all people to the safe room as soon as a tornado warning is issued or a siren is sounded.

  • Step 3:

    Stay in the safe room for several minutes after the storm, large tornadoes have an eye so more destruction could be coming. After several minutes of silence, carefully open the safe room door.

  • Step 4:

    Leash all pets when outside after a tornado. Power lines could be down and dangerous objects will be littered about everywhere. Do not let pets outside unsupervised.

Tips & Warnings

  • Practice the emergency weather plan before bad weather strikes. Get pets used to kenneling or being caged during storms.
  • There are only seconds to act before a tornado strikes, so don’t wait to put pets in carriers and get them in the safe room.

Merry Christmas

December 10th, 2012

Here is a Cyber Christmas Card Video via Drs. Ryan and Molly, enjoy everyone

********Click here to watch it***********

Keep our furry friends safe!

November 23rd, 2011

While we get into the spirit of the season with decorations and food, remember that these things can cause serious disease and even death in our four-legged family members. Cats love to eat ribbons and bows which can get stuck in their mouth or stomach and may even have to be removed surgically. Many dogs love the food we do but remember that too many rich foods, such as cookies and meat, can lead to an upset stomach that may require hospitalization for treatment. Chocolate, especially dark chocolate, can lead to an increased heart rate and death in our canine friends so please keep those candies out of reach.


Graphic courtesy of Fine Line Web Design (Cat in the graphic courtesy of Can Stock Photo)


 

The savage sun is no friend to your pets. Without even realizing it, many pet owners make tragic mistakes that just shouldn’t happen.Dogs, tethered animals, aquarium fish, horses and even pet budgies and guinea pigs commonly suffer heat stress because of human error.Unlike humans, most animals can’t sweat to reduce body heat. Instead, dogs and cats lose heat by panting but there is a limit as to the amount of heat they can shed in this manner.
Dogs in hot cars
The most common mistake is where a dog dies after being left in a hot car. This should never happen, but it does, time and time again. The rules are simple. At this time of year, don’t leave your dog unattended in your car, even with the windows down. Many say, “But I’m only going into the shop for a gallon of milk – I’ll just be a minute”. The ‘just a minute’ extends very quickly if the shop is busy or if you happen to meet a talkative friend. The type of car you drive is also relevant. Those with large glass areas such as hatchbacks and those that are dark in color heat up more quickly than other cars. Studies on various makes of popular cars have determined that dark colored hatchback cars heat up the quickest with temperatures reaching 73 degrees centigrade during testing. This was almost double the outside temperature. In six minutes the temperature of most cars is up to 55 degrees centigrade. If your dog is in the car at this temperature, it will be near death.
What dogs are susceptible to heat stroke?
No matter how healthy your dog is it will not survive if locked in a hot car. However, heatstroke also occurs in other situations, often simply because the weather is hot and humid and people make silly mistakes. All short nosed breeds of dogs, such as Bull Dogs, Pugs and the Pekingese, are very susceptible to heat stress. Obese dogs and cats are at risk too, especially small, fat dogs. Dogs or cats with poor circulation and dogs with any respiratory disease are also susceptible. The biggest risk is from a high ambient temperature in association with high humidity and lack of air circulation – exactly what happens in a car.
Jogging dogs
Extra care needs to be taken when you are out jogging with your dog this summer. Naturally, jog or walk in the cooler times of day, either early morning or late evening, and stop if your dog is struggling to keep up. A dog is so faithful that it won’t want to be left behind and will ignore those vital messages from its body that say ‘stop’ and is in danger of collapse from heat stress. Stop regularly to give your dog a rest and a drink, or even better a cooling swim.
Backyard bungles
Many animals in gardens, yards and paddocks also suffer heat stress. Any animal tethered is at risk. I have seen dogs, goats, cattle and horses die from heat stress when tethered. Animals confined in concrete pens or even birds in cages are also at risk, as they cannot escape the unforgiving heat. If you must tether your animal be absolutely sure that it has ample shade. Many animals twist their tether around a post or tree. They get ‘strung up’ by the neck as they wind themselves around the post. Therefore, as well as partial asphyxiation (choking), they cook in the sun. If you have an animal in an enclosure, be sure that you provide shade. An aluminum kennel in the full sun is nothing other than a giant cooker. Kennels must be in the shade and you should insulate the roof, and aviaries and birdcages must be in the shade for the whole day. Consider having a sleeping area under your house for your dog. The house will provide excellent insulation. Naturally, all animals need water and the bowls should always be placed in the shade. In this heat, two water bowls are needed, should one be overturned.
 

Emergency care
Heat stroke causes incredible damage. Affected animals will first show excitation, followed by loss of balance and seizures, as the blood vessels in the brain engorge. A coma will follow. Heart failure is common and many other changes in body organs occur. The animal is at grave risk. Emergency first aid is vital and you will need to get to a vet quickly. While you are contacting your vet, cool the animal by placing it in a room temperature (not iced) water bath or by hosing it. Place the wet animal in front of the fan and apply ice packs to its head.Your veterinarian will need to give medication to control any seizures and to prevent further damage being caused to the animal’s brain. He or she may give it a water enema to reduce its body temperature. It is likely that your pet will be placed onto an intravenous drip. Your vet may also anaesthetize your pet to prevent seizures. Don’t let your pet get hot under the collar in summer. Be cautious and don’t let the heat claim your pet as its trophy.

Instructions

Things You’ll Need:

  • Kennel or Crate
  • Cages
  • Bottled water
  • Safe place
  • Pet Inside” stickers

Make an Emergency Plan to Keep Pets Safe During a Tornado

  • Step 1:

    Find a kennel, crate or cage for every animal you have. Buckets work well for fish and turtles. Keep all of the animal carriers together in an easy to get to place inside the house.

  • Step 2:

    Choose the safest room in the house for surviving a tornado. A basement is best or the most interior room of the home, preferably a closet or bathroom. Tell everyone living in the house that this is the safe room for tornadoes.

  • Step 3:

    Make an emergency food supply for the pets in case it is in short supply or hard to get to after the storm. Get pull tab cans or pouches for easy opening, and you can toss in a cheap bowl or paper plates. Pack a collar and leash for each dog or cat as well.

  • Step 4:

    Add an extra gallon or two of water to the family emergency supply. This way there will be plenty to go around.

What To Do When a Tornado Siren Sounds or a Tornado Warning is Issued

  • Step 1:

    Put all pets in cages or carriers and in the safe room when the tornado watch is issued. Animals sense bad weather and will look for a place to hide if they sense it is near. There will probably not be much of an argument from the pets in the safe room where it is quiet.

  • Step 2:

    Get all people to the safe room as soon as a tornado warning is issued or a siren is sounded.

  • Step 3:

    Stay in the safe room for several minutes after the storm, large tornadoes have an eye so more destruction could be coming. After several minutes of silence, carefully open the safe room door.

  • Step 4:

    Leash all pets when outside after a tornado. Power lines could be down and dangerous objects will be littered about everywhere. Do not let pets outside unsupervised.

Tips & Warnings

  • Practice the emergency weather plan before bad weather strikes. Get pets used to kenneling or being caged during storms.
  • There are only seconds to act before a tornado strikes, so don’t wait to put pets in carriers and get them in the safe room.

While it may not feel like spring is here to us, the bothersome insects have not been slowed down.  Ticks, fleas and mosquitoes are coming out and bring their diseases with them.  Mosquitoes carry Heartworm disease which infects and kills many dogs and cats every year.  Mosquitoes also carry West Nile Virus which rarely affects our dogs and cats but has significant health implications in people and our equine friends.  Ticks carry Lyme disease and Anaplasmosis, two bacterial infections of dogs and people.  While we write about these same diseases every year, they need to be mentioned again since more and more people are also getting infected, especially with Anaplasmosis.  According to the Minnesota Department of Health, record numbers of people in Minnesota became infected with Anaplasmosis making it as common as Lyme disease in people.  Since both Lyme disease and Anaplasmosis are carried by the “deer tick” (now renamed the “black legged tick”), tick control needs to be a high priority for all of us.  Here are a few ways to help keep us and our pets protected from disease carrying ticks:

  • - Apply a topical flea and tick killer such as Frontline Plus to your cat or dog every month.  This ensures that the fleas and ticks that your pet may pick up will not survive to come and bite you as the owner or any other people in contact with your pet.  At Skyline we have competitive pricing on Frontline Plus and if you buy 6 doses you get the 7th one free!
  • - Have your dog tested for Lyme disease and Anaplasmosis yearly.  This will let you know if your pet has been exposed and may need treatment.  At Skyline we offer the 4Dx test which will test your dog for Heartworm disease, Lyme disease, Anaplasmosis and Canine erhlichiosis, all for only $39!
  • - Check yourself and your pets for ticks after a day outside.
  • - Wear light colored clothing so you can spot ticks on yourself easier.

As for protecting your dog or cat from Heartworm disease, all it takes is a once monthly chewable tablet such as Iverhart Plus and your pet will be safe from Heartworm disease and some common intestinal parasites.  At Skyline we have great pricing on Iverhart Plus and then you get a rebate on top of that!

Please contact us at 763-574-9892 for more information on these insect borne diseases and the awesome deals we have on products to protect your pets from them.

If you would like more information on human Lyme disease and Anaplasmosis, please check out the following link: http://www.health.state.mn.us/news/pressrel/2011/ticks050611.html.

 

Please everyone be careful, but also note our loved ones in furry coats are getting this too.  We have found this disease in 60 dogs since 2010 spring and the number is growing.  We advise a yearly 4DX heartworm test for $39 to prevent and detect this disease for it is included in the test.  Call us today to have a tech do this simple test for your dog.

http://www.health.state.mn.us/news/pressrel/2011/ticks050611.html

Thanks, for all the thoughts and prayers for Dr Ken Speltz the past week as he continues to do well with healing. He will remain out of the office until at least April 11th as he recoverys. We will continue to forward all cards and gifts to his house for you all if sent to the clinic.

What you need to know

March 10th, 2011

Due to the importance of this information and continued inquiries by clients, we are reposting the following fact sheets we previously sent out about leptospirosis and xylitol toxicity.

Leptospirosis

Here are a few facts about the disease:

  • Leptospirosis is caused by bacteria which are carried by small rodents and excreted in their urine.  The bacteria can live for many months in water.
  • Dogs that are exposed to water sources that may be contaminated by rodents are at risk of catching Leptospirosis.  Most cases are diagnosed in the summer and early fall.
  • Signs that can be seen in dogs with leptospirosis include fever, bleeding, vomiting, diarrhea, unwillingness to eat, lethargy, depression, and yellow tinting to the gums.
  • Leptospirosis infection causes damage to the liver and kidneys.
  • This disease is seen in Minnesota but is not common.  Leptospirosis is treatable with antibiotics if caught early.
  • There is a vaccine available for dogs.  Ask us about it today.

 

Xylitol Toxicity

You may not have heard of xylitol but it is likely you have a product with it around your house or have had in the past.  Xylitol is a low calorie sugar substitute that can be found in everything from sugar-free gum and candy to tooth paste.  It is also sold in powder form to be used in baking and cooking.  While there have been studies to show the benefits of xylitol to humans, it can be highly toxic in dogs.  Here are a few important facts about xylitol toxicity:

  • It only takes 2-3 pieces of xylitol gum that contains 1g per piece to be toxic to a 50lb dog.
  • Signs of xylitol toxicity include vomiting, ataxia (uncoordinated movements), collapse and seizures.
  • Xylitol causes low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) and liver failure in dogs.
  • If any ingestion of xylitol is suspected or known about in your dog, contact us immediately and bring your dog in for exam.
  • Low blood sugar and liver damage can be treated if caught early enough.  If treatment for these problems is not done quickly enough, the dog can suffer permanent brain and/or liver damage and possibly die.
  • Xylitol had not been proven to cause toxicity in cats or other pets but we recommend not giving any products containing xylitol to any animal.

Xylitol toxicity is serious so please keep your sugar-free products in a safe location away from your four-legged family members.

It may not be that time of year but cranberries are good for the bladder all year long.  You may have heard that cranberry juice can help with urinary tract infections and it is true.  Well now your dog can get all the benefits of cranberry juice in a chewable tablet.  Crananidin is a new product that contains the bioactive compound, PAC, found in cranberries.  PACs help to stop infection-causing E. coli bacteria from sticking to the bladder thus helping prevent a bladder infection.  We are excited to be able to offer this new product, Crananidin, to your help your pet.  For more information and to see if Crananidin is right for your dog, please talk to our doctors.

crananidin pic

© Copyright 2011 Skyline Veterinary Fridley, MN